When is Black History Month?

Black History Month is celebrated every year in the United States during the month of February. This month is set aside to recognize and celebrate the accomplishments and contributions of black Americans throughout history.

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What is Black History Month?

Black History Month is an annual observance in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom for remembrance of important people and events in the history of the African diaspora. It is celebrated in February in the United States and Canada, and October in the United Kingdom. The earliest recorded use of the term “Black History Month” was by historian Carter G. Woodson and the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History in 1976.

When is Black History Month?

In the United States, Black History Month is celebrated in February. This month-long celebration pays tribute to the achievements and contributions of black Americans throughout history.

Black History Month was first observed in 1976, when President Gerald Ford urged Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.”

Since then, each American president has issued a proclamation declaring February as Black History Month. In 2017, President Donald Trump proclaimed February as National African American History Month, calling on all Americans to “celebrate this month with appropriate programs, activities, and materials.”

Black History Month is also celebrated in Canada, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands.

The History of Black History Month

Though African American history can be traced back to the 16th century, the origins of Black History Month date back to 1926. That year, historian Carter G. Woodson and the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History announced the second week of February to be “Negro History Week.”

Woodson, who is sometimes referred to as the “Father of Black History,” chose February because it contained the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass — two men who had a significant impact on the lives of African Americans.

The first celebration was a success, and Negro History Week quickly became a national observance. In 1976, during America’s bicentennial year, President Gerald Ford officially recognized Black History Month. He urged Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.”

Since then, each American president has designated February as Black History Month. In 2006, Senator Barack Obama (D-IL) introduced a resolution recognizing Black History Month as a national observance. The resolution passed unanimously in both the House and the Senate.

Celebrating Black History Month

Black History Month is an annual celebration of the achievements and contributions of black Americans. The event originated in 1926 as “Negro History Week,” which was created by historian Carter G. Woodson and other leading African Americans. The weeklong celebration was later expanded to a month-long event in 1976.

Black History Month is observed in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. In the United States, the event is also known as African American History Month.

The theme for Black History Month 2021 is “The Black Family: Representation, Identity, and Diversity.” This theme was chosen to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the show “The Cosby Show,” which debuted in 1984 and featured a middle-class African American family. The theme also pays tribute to the important role that black families have played in American history.

Black History Month is a time to remember the past and celebrate the present. It’s a time to honor the achievements of black Americans, learn about black history and culture, and explore ways to create a more just and equitable society for everyone.

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